News With Nezua | Empire Games

MAJOR POWERS PLAY MAJOR GAMES. How do these apply to the Democrats and their actions lately on immigration? How do these apply to the promises made to raza? Here comes the election game, let’s play!

This episode of News With Nezua is brought to you by Center for New Community. YouTube version here. Past episodes are archived here.


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  1. [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by News With Nezua, LatinoNewz, Left of Liberal, and others. unapologeticmex said: Órale! New Post: News With Nezua | Empire Games: This episode of News With Nezua is brought to you by Center for… http://bit.ly/dv5ha6 [...]

  2. Deb says:

    Hola Nezua! So glad to see you’re okay! As I watched you, and heard your voice break in the beginning, explaining how hard it has been to come to the realization that the Changeling and his crew, as well as the Republicans and theirs, had no intention of standing with, or for so many, many people – mi corazón hizo también. I know that feeling well (not about the Changeling – I’ve never trusted him; but about politics in general and Black politicians in particular).

    It took me a very long time to get to the point where you now seem to be about government, politics and at times, even humanity. But recognizing and feeling that truth, that betrayal, was necessary for the “unscaling” that led to continued growth in thinking critically – as it has with you.

    And yes, being able to “claim credit,” is all either of them wants – even as they throw it in your face by ramping up troops on the border and touting increased deportation numbers. It IS just a game to them, Man. “Good strategy!” is always what they and the pundits say. I think what’s most disheartening is that so many people are believing their heavy-on-strategy vs results shtick. {smdh}

    I just read this at HuffPo wherein Mr. Hutchinson seems to say – “Yeah, Black folk, he’s coming back to you, to help him get these clowns back in, and that’s okay – even though he’s given you his a$$ to kiss since he came begging and lying the first time!”: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/earl-ofari-hutchinson/obama-plays-the-race-card_b_766592.html

    I felt like I was in some bizarro world! – which is why I’m glad you did this piece. At least SOMEBODY’S saying, “No Man, using us for votes, ain’t okay!; Lying so you can ‘claim credit’, ain’t okay!; and coming back again after all of that – certainly is NOT okay!” And if
    you keep voting for them – unchanged, it’ll never be okay (sometimes I wonder if it ever will!)! So, I’m right there with you in the “proactive action” of not voting at this point (tired of lies, lies and damn lies with no substantive result).

    I’d started working on a similar post in response to Hutchinson’s piece and I would really like your permission to re-post this as it’s introduction in order to compare and contrast the two. I’ve just started writing it, so no rush on your reply. I’ll keep checking back.

    Congrats on your new venture, and I hope you’ll be able to secure continuing sponsorship for this site – because your voice has been an important and honest one.

    • nezua says:

      Hey Deb, thanks a lot for the support. And for taking the time that you have to communicate. I am shaking my damn head with ya. I have my own issues with the lenses used sometimes by Mr. Hutchinson. I look forward to reading your piece.

      You have my blessing as far as reposting and whatnot.

      Be well,
      Nez

  3. Deb says:

    Muchas! I’ll be done by tomorrow. Stay well.

  4. michael mandel says:

    Great to see you back, Nezua, even if it is to point out the hypocrisy and insincerity of elected officials. It seems to me that Congress will not change one bit or move to a more humane and just position on immigration until they feel that their very jobs are threatened. Clearly there is not enough goodness in their hearts to do it for the right reason – which is obviously because it is the right thing to do. I cannot blame anyone who is affected by immigration (or many, many other issues) who refuses to vote next month. I read somewhere (maybe it was you?) that Latin@s and others who don’t vote are not apathetic – instead they ARE voting, only it’s a vote of no confidence for the people who built up their hopes and dreams and not only didn’t fight for them, but truly went in the exact opposite direction. I can understand if Obama pushed as hard as he could for immigration reform both behind closed doors and in public but just couldn’t sway a hostile Congress. At least it would have been a sincere effort. Or if he directed ICE to stop deportations or used other means available to the president to lessen the daily terror facing immigrant communities. But to publically brag about the record number of deportations just plain sickens me.

    Anyway, best of luck with Digital Stoneworks. The graphic is beautiful and the work sounds important and meaningful. Wishing you and the others involved all the best!

  5. michael mandel says:

    Nezua,

    Forgot to add that even though it’s still a way uphill battle, the DREAM Act hasn’t officially died yet. The battle will continue next month when it gets considered as a stand alone bill. And while I’m not holding out too much hope, I have been incredibly inspired by the DREAMers leading the movement and am convinced that they’ll make it happen at some point, hopefully sooner rather than later. That it hasn’t passed yet is perhaps the most damning criticism possible of those in power.

  6. Deb says:

    And so it begins: “Obama signs executive order enhancing Hispanic education initiative” – http://www.cnn.com/2010/POLITICS/10/19/obama.hispanic.students/index.html?eref=mrss_igoogle_politics

    (Still working on that post.)

  7. [...] Abandon hope.. or, thinking outside the (ballot) box 20 October 2010 by richmx2 Nezua, in riffing on the upcoming U.S. elections (and the failure to pass even minimal immigration reform) compares what was said, with what was done (and not done): [...]

  8. I had just read about the comprehensive immigration reform bill and on the surface I thought it might be good and even pushed it on twitter after another good intentioned person sent it to me.

    To know now that it is militant in nature focusing on enforcement is welcome. Ignorance is spread so easily when the true message is hidden behind good intentions.

    Thanks for bringing the game into the light as always.

    ;}

    Danielle

    • nezua says:

      Naw, that’s cool. I mean, the bill has a few good things in it. But the entire discussion of immigration post-9/11 has become one of fear of infiltration, and a matter of state security, and it’s become par for the course that the surveillance state needs to grow and police and military power must be made stronger…but to staunch what? Social fluctuations. Economic fallout. Immigration. The free movement over land to follow commerce that the economic refugee undertakes to survive. That is today’s ‘immigration problem’ that is being met with troops and raids from ICE units and detention center and a creeping technological net of surveillance and enmeshing of civil and state authorities with federal and military forces.

      None of this will stop the economic imbalance that is driving people to come to the USA. These things will just increase the violence and harm and pain and loss that is experienced among the People. So the Dems are feeding money to the hungry and ever-growing police state, which already locks up brown and black people at a higher proportion than the rest of the population, and regardless of what populations are actually committing more crime.

      But just the appearance however briefly of a bill on CIR at all is meant to arouse and inflame Latino voters to GO DEMOCRAT like a bull seeing a flag waved in their face. Nobody is making demands when these are waved about, or when election time comes back. It apparently would be gauche to demand an accounting from failing these last two years to meet promises. And hey. Why would they ever answer for anything at all? No matter what they do, everyone is just working themselves into a froth to Get Them Elected Again.

      Thanks for comin’ round, Danielle…didn’t mean to soapbox, ay yi yi.

  9. René Álvarez says:

    I just came across your blog today and enjoyed the videos I watched. I understand that you’re providing perspective from your vantage point in the US, but I’m unfamiliar with your views concerning the other side of the issues you address.

    I am US born and educated through college, but I’ve lived just across the border in Tecate since I was seven, crossing the border every day to go to school. Today, I scratch a living teaching English at my own little school in Mexico for a pittance, mostly to engineers and other middle class, university-trained professionals, as well as to college-bound adolescents. I also offer a free ride to promising underprivileged youths. I estimate that 95 percent of my students intend to live their lives in Mexico.

    Usonian responsibility aside, what is your take on the lack of a Mexican body politic that can exercise enough unity and pressure to accomplish much more than the usual call-in grievances on the radio? Average Mexicans understand better than most outsiders what truly ails this country politically, but are still more likely to support a candidate who calls on the US to loosen various immigration policies than they are to back one who presents a domestic agenda that addresses jobs, education, public safety, and feasible economic growth and opportunity. (To my knowledge, Mexico is the only sovereign nation that demands that another country take in its people and make them citizens.) It seems to me that if people are dying in the deserts of Arizona, we should scrutinize what was at their backs more than that which they were running towards. From where I’m browsing, it seems that Mexicans in Mexico are getting little if any support from their “concerned” Latino brethren in the US when it comes to addressing bad Mexican governance. In fact, very few Mexicans can relate to that Diaspora, whose constituents are dismissed as assimilated, disconnected “pochos”.

    I noticed that in one of your videos, a great many Latinos were protesting SB 1070. I wonder how many of those protesters who are undocumented ever pressured Mexican elected officials in that way, pero acá donde la represión y las represalias son más cabronas.

    • nezua says:

      I just came across your blog today and enjoyed the videos I watched. I understand that you’re providing perspective from your vantage point in the US, but I’m unfamiliar with your views concerning the other side of the issues you address.

      Hi, thanks. Yes, I provide perspective from where I live, who I am from where I’ve come and what I’ve come through, and that’s about it.

      But I do not think there is an “other side.” This implies a binary that is nonexistent. There are various angles depending on one’s education, beliefs, interests, background, immediate situation, and of course, agenda. But I get you. You mean you have a viewpoint that ultimately conflicts with what you’ve heard and read here.

      I am US born and educated through college, but I’ve lived just across the border in Tecate since I was seven, crossing the border every day to go to school. Today, I scratch a living teaching English at my own little school in Mexico for a pittance, mostly to engineers and other middle class, university-trained professionals, as well as to college-bound adolescents. I also offer a free ride to promising underprivileged youths.

      That’s a very nice beginning. Honest-feeling. Humble. Earnest and hard-working. I like your character, here.

      I estimate that 95 percent of my students intend to live their lives in Mexico. Usonian responsibility aside, what is your take on the lack of a Mexican body politic that can exercise enough unity and pressure to accomplish much more than the usual call-in grievances on the radio?

      Wow. Suddenly I feel as if I am in your classroom. POP QUIZ!! My “take”? Are you asking if I approve? What my general opinion is on Mexican society and government? Or are you positing a series of questions in reference to the assumed answer, and thus ultimately to a point you choose not to make directly?

      My take is that you are saying “The Mexican people are disorganized.” Or “The Mexican people are deficient.”

      Okay. I am noting your opinion.

      Average Mexicans understand better than most outsiders what truly ails this country politically, but are still more likely to support a candidate who calls on the US to loosen various immigration policies than they are to back one who presents a domestic agenda that addresses jobs, education, public safety, and feasible economic growth and opportunity.

      Okay. Begin with an Appeal to Authority, and then imply that A) the “Average Mexican” is being dishonest in her/his political positions, and for ends that would characterize him/her as ignoring the hard work to be done in her/his own land, in favor of mooching off of the USA. So really, you are just being clever in this folksy tone and yet bringing a tired talking point that I’ve seen here for years. It’s “Fix your own country first.” Which really ignores a lot of history as well as economic destruction wrought by US policies.

      (To my knowledge, Mexico is the only sovereign nation that demands that another country take in its people and make them citizens.)

      This made me laugh. I mean you sorta broke tone here and weakened your overall attack. It’s far too colloquial and urban legendy. In fact, it echoes those raving strange email forwards that the extreme fanatic fringes of the Right send around to their unsuspecting family members. You should stick with the professorial thing.

      Mexico, as a nation, is not “demanding” any such thing. You make it sound like there is a giant sombrero-wearing marshmallow man banging on a gate. You are personifying the same system of injustice and imbalance that creates projects right next to well-policed, well-heeled neighborhoods around the USA. WITHIN the USA. Mexico is not some monolith that prefers American citizenship. Mexicans love Mexico. That’s my read on it, from whom I speak to. This is a survival thing. Your tone of “Oh, the brown people love being lazy and sponging off ENTIDALMINT PROGRAMZ” reeks of ARWCD (American Right Wing Cognitive Disease). That’s not relevant to our discussion. But I am letting you know in case you wanna brush up your shtick.

      More importantly, the USA’s immigration issue is not about Mexicans…is it? It’s about people coming from many lands. As long as we pretend the issues exists only between USA and Mexico, it’s very easy to pretend the real issue isn’t much bigger and about the same thing so many other issues are about, underneath, today. About greed, and about a small cadre of members electing themselves as the beneficiary of the work and fruits of so many more of us. A one way valve, forever and ever, amen.

      It seems to me that if people are dying in the deserts of Arizona, we should scrutinize what was at their backs more than that which they were running towards.

      Well, I’d prefer (again) to avoid binary thinking. But I do agree that we should look at everything that contributes to this issue, as well as everything the benefits, and everything that is related. Not just in one of two “directions” (as if all immigrants come from one direction!)

      From where I’m browsing, it seems that Mexicans in Mexico are getting little if any support from their “concerned” Latino brethren in the US when it comes to addressing bad Mexican governance. In fact, very few Mexicans can relate to that Diaspora, whose constituents are dismissed as assimilated, disconnected “pochos”.

      We address the issues as connected worldwide. “We” being those who care and who have fight to bring to bear.

      But we come from our own vantage point, and we talk about what we know as much as possible, and we do our parts where we are able, and sometimes that means where we live. And sometimes we reach out and connect much larger areas and amounts of people.

      All of us. Mexicans, Mexicans in the USA, our beautiful African American brothers and sisters, our ABC, our Fijan-descended, our First People and Native American friends, and many more. Muslim, Buddhist, Christian, too. You are right that ethnicity and nation of origin, etc, are not foolproof bonds. We do not all align all the time on all issues.

      We all do what we can to try and speak out against and fight the sly divisions drawn by weak but clever forces in this world. These divisions and imbalances result in “immigration problems” as well as are spawned and manipulated by those who would sip and siphon away the stress and blood and coin that is produced by these divisions. But we are winning. It’s a slow, long arc. In the meanwhile, we chop off the head of snakes and gophers where they rise up, insinuating and snide. And then walk on by.

      I noticed that in one of your videos, a great many Latinos were protesting SB 1070. I wonder how many of those protesters who are undocumented ever pressured Mexican elected officials in that way, pero acá donde la represión y las represalias son más cabronas.

      I wonder. It’s fun to wonder. I’m glad you come here to have fun. I hope you had fun today. Come back anytime!

  10. [...] would be remiss if I didn’t give a shout to Nezua. News With Nezua (on his main blog Unapologetic Mexican) doesn’t get updated nearly often enough, but it is [...]

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